Beijing Chicken heats up this Austin cookery

Our family took the high road to China last night with my Beijing Chicken.  We squeezed the last drop of lemon juice from one lonely lemon to create a timely version of the dish here in Austin.  If you can’t get to Beijing to check out the Games in person, and like me, you’re settling with the spoon-fed televised selections, prep this dish to enhance the experience.

Road to Beijing Chicken

Join the spirit of the Games during this Olympic year with my Road to Beijing Chicken dish.  Its old world Asian flavors will liven up your senses as your guests cheer the chef on to victory.

 

10 boneless, skinless chicken thighs

3 tablespoons light soy sauce

2 tablespoons canola oil

1 teaspoon sesame seeds

1 teaspoon salt

½ teaspoon freshly ground pepper

1 tablespoon gin

 

1 cup sugar

1 cup chicken stock

¼ cup balsamic vinegar

¼ cup red wine vinegar

½ cup lemon juice, freshly squeezed

1 tablespoon lemon zest or finely chopped lemon rind

1 tablespoon cornstarch

 

6 medium carrots, thinly sliced (I feed these through my KitchenAid thin slicer.)

1 large green pepper, thinly sliced

4 scallions, chopped in small pieces

 

1 heart Romaine lettuce, chopped and reserved for serving.

 

Preheat oven to 375 degrees.  Thoroughly rinse chicken thighs and place in baking dish.  Mix soy sauce, canola oil, sesame seeds, salt, pepper and gin.  Pour mixture over chicken and refrigerate for 20 minutes.  Bake for 45 minutes, uncovered.

 

During the baking process, slice carrots, green pepper and scallions and set aside.

 

In medium saucepan, combine sugar, chicken stock, balsamic vinegar, red wine vinegar, lemon juice and lemon zest or peel.  Bring to a low boil and stir in cornstarch.  Remove from heat.  Just before serving this dish, add carrots, green pepper and scallions to saucepan.  Warm vegetables through.

 

Place chopped Romaine in serving dish.  Layer chicken thighs on bed of lettuce.  Smother with sauce.        

SHARE:

Share on facebook
Facebook
Share on twitter
Twitter
Share on pinterest
Pinterest
Share on linkedin
LinkedIn

RELATED POSTS

Chowder for the Wolf at the Door

When 10 pounds of potatoes and a couple dozen ears of corn show up unannounced, welcome them home to the chowder pot. After transforming our

Apple Soup Sendoff

Farewells bring on mingled emotions. Some signal “goodbyes” and others “so longs,” with hopes to stay connected even over long distances. When the time came

Peppered Corn Meal

Preparing the perfect polenta sounds easy enough, but around my kitchen, it takes added patience to work with the grainy flour ground from white or